Monday, June 5, 2017

For Those Just Getting Started In Fitness

Often times the end of a journey gets the glory, but what about the beginning? The beginning is often forgotten except to give reference to how long and incredible the change was. This is counter-intuitive though as the beginning gives the frame of reference for everything that happens afterwards. You never hear anyone glorifying how they started off as world class marathoners and ended up being world class marathoners, you hear about a person starting off barely able to walk a mile and ending up doing their first 5k, 10k, marathon, triathlon.

What does this have to do with your fitness journey Your fitness journey? You have to have an understanding of where you are in the beginning to know how to get to where you want to be. This requires an honest assessment of yourself, your strengths, weakness, (you may have many to start with) and your willingness to do whatever you need to to find your way to the health, fitness, and body you want.

For this you are going to need a map to find your way and hopefully this series will give you an outline for what to do, where to look, and how to go about it.

First, and you probably saw this coming, you need to give thought into where you are and where you'd like to end up in three, six, nine months, and even a year? You might even want to consider where you want to be in a month.

Knowing your starting point could be as much as acknowledging that you may or may not be ready to jump into interval training or jump training, it could mean acknowledging that you don't have much flexibility or mobility and that you need work in that area before you can start doing what you'd like to be doing.

But where do you want to be? This is may be easy to visualize (a podium, a scale, a look) and to know what you want to be/see/do, but it could also be a struggle so that's what I want you to figure out first. Here are some possible goals/needs.

-Weight Loss: How much? How quickly? (Keep in mind 1-2 lbs/week is usually what is recommended for safety and consistency reasons) Simplifying Weight Loss

-Strength: Why? How strong? For Athletic Performance? For daily life? Keep in mind that your reason for strength goals should have a large affect on what you do and how you go about it. Resources for strength training

-Mobility/Flexibility This is usually overlooked, but is important as your mobility is going to dictate what you can safely do, and a good program/plan of action will likely include some mobility even if it's not the goal.

-Muscle Gain: Gaining muscle takes a load off of your joints, makes you look better, and increases your metabolism, making it easier to maintain or lose weight if that is your goal. This is especially important and equally ignored topic for women, adding 5-10 lbs. of muscle means a lot in terms of health benefits for women and shapes the body making most goal looks a lot more plausible. Simplifying Mass Gaining

-Athleticism: Maybe you need to work on speed, cardio, quickness for your chosen sport(s), Usually this goes hand in hand with strength, weight loss, and muscle gain in the beginning, but at some point training for athletic ability becomes more specialized. It could be six months or a year depending on your starting point.

Once you know your goals and why you can develop a plan for how to get here, so give that some thought, write it down, and let me know in the comments what you'd like help with.

What You Need to Know About Conditioning
If You're Looking to Get Stronger
How To Create A Program

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